SPECIAL INTEREST TOUR
Rajasthan Rajasthan with Goa
Rajasthan with Goa. India has a coastline of over seven... Read more
kerala Kerala Tour
Kerala is one of India’s larges ports and a major naval base.... Read more
Bandhavgarh Forts and Palaces

Bandhavgarh Fort

The Bandhavgarh Fort is situated in Bandhavgarh in Umaria district of Madhya Pradesh, India. It is located on the Bandhavgarh hill, rising 811 meters above sea level at the centre of the Bandhavgarh National Park.The main gate of the Fort is called Karn Pol, and on entering through this, one will see huge grasslands interspersed with large reservoirs of water which have turtles, and the many remains of human inhabitants of the Fort - from ancient statues to the barracks occupied by Rewa's troops up to independence. Those who do not wish to visit the Fort, must at least visit the reclining Vishnu located at Shesh Saya. As mentioned earlier vehicles can drive up till here. Various dynasties have ruled the fort: for example, The Mauryans from 3rd century BC, Vakataka rulers from 3rd century to 5th century the Sengars from 5th century and the Kalachuris from 10th century. In the 13th century, the Baghels took over, ruling from Bandhavgarh until 1617, when Maharaja Vikramaditya Singh moved his capital to Rewa. The last inhabitants deserted the fort in 1935. The main gate of the Fort is called Karn Pol, and on entering through this, one will see huge grasslands interspersed with large reservoirs of water which have turtles, and the many remains of human inhabitants of the Fort - from ancient statues to the barracks occupied by Rewa's troops up to independence. Kabir Das, a celebrated 16th Century saint, once lived and preached here. The temple where Lakshmana was worshiped is still functioning, with Lakshmana still the God of the Fort. Earlier there was a priest whose allegiance was with the Maharaja of Rewa. The present priest is an employee of the forest department. Two major festivals are celebrated at the temple with the local surrounding population being allowed free access during this time. The main gate of the Fort is called Karn Pol, and on entering through this, one will see huge grasslands interspersed with large reservoirs of water which have turtles, and the many remains of human inhabitants of the Fort - from ancient statues to the barracks occupied by Rewa's troops up to independence. Kabir Das, a celebrated 16th Century saint, once lived and preached here. The temple where Lakshmana was worshiped is still functioning, with Lakshmana still the God of the Fort. Earlier there was a priest whose allegiance was with the Maharaja of Rewa. The present priest is an employee of the forest department. Two major festivals are celebrated at the temple with the local surrounding population being allowed free access during this time.

Special Rajasthan Tour